Lorraine Anne Scully

Lorraine found that being the main caregiver in her family left her little chance to focus on anything else apart from her family’s needs.
Interview with Lorraine Anne Scully, an Financial Security Analyst at Intel 

In 2009, Lorraine quit her corporate job to care for her special needs child.
 

Prior to joining the workforce

Lorraine found that being the main caregiver in her family left her little chance to focus on anything else apart from her family’s needs. Being away from the workforce for six years left her with some self-doubt as to whether she could cope with the workload as well as whether her skills were up to par with her colleagues who were still active in the workforce. One of her main concerns, she says, was that she had to prove that despite being away from the workforce, she was still able to contribute to the team. “I had to challenge my self-doubt about my skills and abilities and eventually was able to build the confidence to return to work.”

Finding a balance

Family support is vital and Lorraine credits a major part of her return to her husband and family. “Without their love, time and patience, I would not be able to work with a peaceful mind,” she says. Another important factor in her story is the support from her former boss who understands her family situation and needs. This support comes in the form of flexible working hours. When her son has to attend therapy session(s) or hospital appointments, Lorraine gives her boss advance notice and compensates by either working late or earlier than usual. On some occasions, she would work from home instead.

Advice for others seeking to make the transition

Lorraine’s advice for others is simply this: “Just do it! Don’t over think it. When I first came back, I was so scared of making mistakes and knowing that I am far behind my peers but I realised that it’s all in my head. After that I just dove right into it.”

She encourages women to not be afraid to seek help from colleagues at the workplace in the beginning. Also, being organised is important in the quest to balance family and work. “When I am at work, I’m focused on my work. Work is important to me, likewise my family is important to me too. So when I’m with my family, I tune out from work and fully concentrate on them. I ensure that I give quality time even if it’s not quantity.” 
 
Just do it! Don’t over think it. When I first came back, I was so scared of making mistakes and knowing that I am far behind my peers but I realised that it’s all in my head.
 
Lorraine Anne Scully